Cuba is ripe for entrepreneurs since foreign investment is now welcome and small enterprise is beginning to flourish. The country’s 12 million people constitute the largest potential market in the region. Canadians and Europeans are pouring capital into the country since investment laws have been relaxed. The country’s new investment law allows foreign businessmen to own businesses, their offices and housing. Cuba has left the cold war behind and is now ready to participate in the emerging global economy. The Cuban government realizes the time has come to participate in the new world economic order. The country is now ripe for the international investors who want to start new businesses. It is now time to get your foot in the door before the gold rush begins and hordes of entrepreneurs carve up the island completely. There will be unprecedented investment opportunity awaiting you in the not-too distant future. So, now is the moment for adventurous individuals to reap the tremendous opportunities which may await them in Cuba. Furthermore, in the last 10 years a few of the reforms made to the Cuban economy create limited self employment, legalize the use of U.S. dollars and encourage foreign banking and investment. Additional advantages for foreign investors are a highly educated, well disciplined labor force, tremendous opportunities in tourism’s untapped areas and an improving infrastructure Non U.S. foreigners have been enjoying this paradise for the last couple of decades. It will soon be your turn. Come to Cuba and start a new and exciting life. Take advantage of all of the wonders this beautiful country has to offer. Conditions for investing and living in Cuba are improving. Nobody can foresee the future with absolute certainty. However, given the events of the last couple of years and the direction the country is currently moving, predictions we make in this book are inevitable. Cuba cannot afford to be left out of the mainstream of world progress. The Chinese, Vietnamese and formerly communist European nations have realized this and are opening their markets to the world. Now it’s Cuba’s turn to do the same. Whether change will come tomorrow or even this year is hard to foretell, but it will occur.

Cuba is the most populous and largest island in the Caribbean. Located only 90 miles from the U.S. mainland, Cuba—sometimes called the “Pearl of the Caribbean” for its beauty—boasts miles and miles of breathtaking terrain, towering mountains, spectacular landscapes, quaint colonial towns and a couple of cosmopolitan cities. The 300 odd unspoiled beaches, bays and inlets surrounded by the beautiful crystal clear waters of the Caribbean have always been the island’s main attraction.

The country’s subtropical climate with 300 days of sunshine, low cost of living for residents, an abundance of outdoor activities, towns and cities steeped in history and the friendly fun loving nature of the people, all contribute to its limitless appeals, making it a dream waiting to come true.

The country’s subtropical climate with 300 days of sunshine, low cost of living for residents, an abundance of outdoor activities, towns and cities steeped in history and the friendly fun loving nature of the people, all contribute to its limitless appeals, making it a dream waiting to come true.

The rich flora of the countryside and the scent of tropical flowers always fill the air. Singing tropical birds, butterflies and an abundance of exotic species serve to attract droves of nature lovers. World class scuba diving and sports fishing draw sportsman to the island.

Cuba offers something for every imaginable taste and lifestyle. Trends Magazine predicted that Cuba would someday become the baby boomer’s retirement haven of the future. A
June 1998 issue of the Miami Herald stated, “A mass new migration of retirees will start to settle abroad, lured by the low cost of living to stretch their shrinking pensions, reasonable health costs and warm weather. Cuba will be the hottest destination due to its proximity to the United States and the relative lack of industrialization.”